508-375-6888masstc@barnstablecounty.org

TECHNOLOGIES

There are a small number of technologies to chose from when it comes to phosphorus removal. The following technologies are those that are available for installation through this grant.

This list is non-exhaustive when it comes to phosphorus removal technologies.

PercRite

Using the soils to adsorb phosphorus can be an effective way to cycle phosphorus in the vegetation above the septic system leachfield and attenuate the amount that migrates downward to the water table. Two shallow-placed systems will be an option for homeowners under this project. These systems will be placed in the shallow, undisturbed soil layers and will serve as the leachfield. Because they are in the finer-textured soil layers, they will take up more space than the conventional leachfield placed in sand. Perc-Rite™ presently has approvals in Massachusetts. Sampling devices called lysimeters will be placed beneath these systems for the purpose of monitoring.

Donated Equipment?Units donated for first few installations (cutting down on your cost).
Retrofittable?Can likely use existing septic tank but need new leachfield and pump chamber.
Leachfield ConsiderationsIt may be that a large leachfield will be required (thus taking up more of your yard); this may be offset by needing less excavation or more shallow excavation.
Ongoing CostsElectricity cost for pump chamber; operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system.
Other ConsiderationsThis technology has approval in the state currently, although not for Phosphorus removal; this technology may require less sampling/inspection at the end of the project.

GeoMat

Using the soils to adsorb phosphorus can be an effective way to cycle phosphorus in the vegetation above the septic system leachfield and attenuate the amount that migrates downward to the water table. Two shallow-placed systems will be an option for homeowners under this project. These systems will be placed in the shallow, undisturbed soil layers and will serve as the leachfield. Because they are in the finer-textured soil layers, they will take up more space than the conventional leachfield placed in sand. GeoMat™ presently has approvals in Massachusetts. Sampling devices called lysimeters will be placed beneath these systems for the purpose of monitoring.

Donated Equipment?Units donated for first few installations (cutting down on your cost).
Retrofittable?Can likely use existing septic tank but need new leachfield and pump chamber.
Leachfield ConsiderationsIt may be that a large leachfield will be required (thus taking up more of your yard); this may be offset by needing less excavation or more shallow excavation.
Ongoing CostsElectricity cost for pump chamber; operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system.
Other ConsiderationsThis technology has approval in the state currently, although not for Phosphorus removal; this technology may require less sampling/inspection at the end of the project.

PhosRid

This technology removes phosphorus from water through reductive iron dissolution (iron dissolving in an anaerobic environment and freed to combine or mineralize with phosphorus). The system involves the installation of a media tank and a polishing filter prior to the leachfield. More information on the performance can be obtained at the Lombardo Associates website.

Donated Equipment?No equipment donated (you will need to buy the technology in addition to the other costs).
Retrofittable?Yes (if site elevation allows).
Leachfield ConsiderationsNone.
Ongoing CostsNeed to replace media every 5-7 years, may need to pump the system more frequently; operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system.
Other ConsiderationsPilot Approval currently exists for this technology in the state of Massachusetts.

Waterloo EC-P

This technology removes phosphorus by the precipitation of iron-phosphate minerals. Natural iron electrodes are installed in the septic tank or in a small chamber immediately thereafter and a small current is applied to the electrodes. The iron is dissolved into the sewage stream where it reacts with phosphorus to form highly stable and insoluble iron-phosphate minerals. The Waterloo EC-P effluent then passes thought to the leachfield where the iron-phosphate minerals precipitate out preventing phosphorus from reaching the natural environment. More information on the system can be found at the Waterloo website.

Donated Equipment?Units donated for first few installations (cutting down on your cost).
Retrofittable?Yes (if site allows) but will need new leachfield to allow monitoring
Leachfield ConsiderationsNeed new leachfield to install lysimeters, which allow sample to be taken.
Ongoing CostsElectricity cost for pump chamber; need to replace electrodes every 2-3 years (per website)operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system.
Other ConsiderationsPilot Approval currently exists for this technology in the state of Massachusetts.

Phos-4-Fade

For this technology, a patented, non-mechanical component is installed downstream of an advanced treatment unit (a Singulair or Hydro-Kinetic system). The phosphorus component has an adsorption media that can be replaced. Information on the system can be obtained at the Norweco website.

Donated Equipment?(unknown about donations)
Retrofittable?No.
Leachfield ConsiderationsNone.
Ongoing CostsNeed to replace media; will need to be put in downstream of a Singulair or Hydro Kinetic which is a separate IA system which could mean higher electricity costs and possibly additional sampling and maintenance; operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system.
Other ConsiderationsTechnology will need site-specific Pilot Approval; a Singulair or Hydrokinetic unit needs to be upstream of the phosphorus-removal unit.

CRX II by FujiClean USA™

The CRX II technology is based on installation of over 4,000 phosphorus removal systems in Japan and Australia. This technology integrates iron electrolysis into its standard denitrification treatment process to simultaneously maximize reduction of both nitrogen and phosphorus nutrients as well as BOD and TSS. Treatment is accomplished in a continuous flow process through a 3-chambered tank sized according to hydraulic flow and organic strength. The entire process is driven by air flowing from one small linear diaphragm blower positioned external to the treatment tank. The device consists of a control box, relay box, and iron electrodes. The electrodes release ferric ions that react with phosphate and orthophosphate ions that exist in the wastewater. The reaction produces an insoluble byproduct. This byproduct settles to the bottom of the device. See more at the FujiClean website.

Donated Equipment?Units donated for first few installations (cutting down on your cost)
Retrofittable?No, need to install entire system
Leachfield ConsiderationsNone.
Ongoing CostsElectricity cost for blower; cost to pump the system more frequently; operation and maintenance cost of I/A septic system
Other ConsiderationsTechnology will need site-specific Pilot Approval; there may be a bit of wait time (unit coming from Japan)

Composting Toilet

Composting toilets utilize biological decomposition under properly maintained conditions (aeration, moisture content, and temperature). Depending on the type of system used, blackwater is eliminated or minimized. In either case, toilets are plumbed separately from graywater (wastewater from sinks, showers, kitchen), and are connected to a composting unit where material is broken down. The end result is a stable compost material. Some systems produce a liquid byproduct and/or diverted urine. These end products, which may contain much of the phosphorus, and do not typically contribute to local eutrophication because they are not discharged underground. Watch a video about composting toilets here.

Donated Equipment?(unknown about donations, unconfirmed financial incentive pending)
Retrofittable?Requires replacing conventional flush fixtures with dry toilets, micro or foam flush toilets, vacuum flush toilets, or urine diverting toilets. Retrofits should be assessed on a case by case basis to determine which system can be accommodated. Spatial constraints can limit system options.
Leachfield ConsiderationsMay be able to receive a 40% size reduction credit on leachfield, utilize existing leachfield, or existing cesspool for greywater.
Ongoing CostsIf not performed by homeowner, cost of maintenance services and removal of byproducts.
Other ConsiderationsSome composting toilet systems are approved for general use and do not require special permitting, while others may require additional fees and approvals. If installing the system for nitrogen credit, a contract to remove the byproducts may be required. Nutrient Networks Inc. is available as a resource and provides site assessment services for composting toilets.

Busse by BusseNY®

Busse Green Technology, with NSF 40 and 245 Certification, is able to reduce fecal coliforms to <1 CFU/mL; CBOD to <2 mg/L, Total Nitrogen to 15/16 mg/L, and TSS to <2 mg/L. For phosphorus reduction, a cost-effective tertiary tank is added on at the end of the normal treatment process to reliably reduce Total Phosphorus to <2 mg/L. The process involves conveying the treated effluent into this tank(s) before dispersal to the disposal area. The tank is filled with a ferrous alloy medium that the phosphorus attaches itself to as the wastewater passes through it. The treated effluent is disposed in the normal site specifically approved manner prescribed by permit. Like the BUSSE treatment system itself, the phosphorus removal system is also scalable to treat various flows and volumes. The medium can last up to 5 years before it needs to be replaced. The depleted medium can be recycled, and the phosphorus recovered and recycled. Find out more at https://busseny.com/

Donated Equipment?(unknown about donations, unconfirmed financial incentive pending)
Retrofittable?No, entire system must be installed.
Leachfield ConsiderationsIn new construction, standard leachfield. Retrofits require no modification of leachfield.
Ongoing CostsElectricity costs of unit. Replacement of media every 5 years.
Other ConsiderationsTechnology will need site-specific Pilot Approval. System must be placed inside housing unit (ex. basement, garage).